tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:/posts Y Combinator Posthaven 2014-04-20T13:18:14Z tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/678281 2014-04-16T21:53:05Z 2014-04-17T12:42:23Z TwoTap (YC W14) and Semantics3 (YC W13) work together to streamline e-commerce

We love it when YC companies work together.

Two Tap (YC S14) recently announced a partnership with Semantics3 (YC W13). Semantics3 provides product feed data for over 35 million products. With Two Tap integration, it is now possible to directly purchase the products displayed in Semantics3's API results. This makes it so users can buy products within an app or website, without breaking to load Safari or Chrome. 

Read more about the partnership on TwoTap's blog and Semantics3's blog.

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Y Combinator
tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/678286 2014-04-16T20:50:23Z 2014-04-16T20:50:23Z Superb (YC W11) launches to help you try new places with your friends

The team that brought you Grubwithus has launched Superb, an app that helps you find and experience new places with friends. Read more about the launch on their blog

Congrats to the Superb Team!

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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/677383 2014-04-14T20:00:02Z 2014-04-20T13:18:14Z Welcome Kat, Yuri, Patrick and Elizabeth I’m delighted to announce a promotion and three additions to the YC team.

    Kat Manalac has been our director of outreach since 2013.  She’s done an incredible job, and we’re making her a partner.  In addition to regular partner responsibilities, she’ll continue to be responsible for outreach to prospective founders and for our PR.  Before she joined YC, she was Alexis Ohanian’s chief of staff.

    Yuri Sagalov joined us as a part-time partner last September, but we never got around to announcing it. Yuri is the cofounder and CEO of AeroFS, which he started in 2010.  Yuri will be especially helpful to enterprise companies we fund, which is not an area we’ve historically had much expertise in.  Several founders from the most recent batch went out of their way to tell me how much they’ve liked working with him.

    Patrick Collison is joining us as part-time partner.  Patrick is the cofounder and CEO of Stripe.  He knows a lot about every part of running a startup, but he thinks about hiring and company culture better than anyone else I know.  Previously, he cofounded Auctomatic.

    Elizabeth Iorns is also joining us as a part-time partner.  She’s the cofounder and CEO of Science Exchange.  She has a Ph.D. in cancer biology and knows a great deal about life sciences, which is very helpful given that we’re starting to get a lot of interesting biotechnology companies applying that we’re currently unqualified to judge.  She’s been an informal advisor to a number of Y Combinator companies, and they all praise her startup expertise. 

    Welcome to the team!

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    Sam Altman
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/675797 2014-04-10T17:11:29Z 2014-04-11T11:55:04Z Homejoy (YC S10) brings its cleaning service to London, priced at £13 per hour

    Homejoy, the service for booking a domestic cleaner in a click of a button, has launched in London today.

    First available in the US and Canada and fresh off the back of a $38 million round of funding back in December, Homejoy’s platform is now allowing Londoners to book a cleaner for £13 per hour.

    Read the full story on The Next Web
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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/675304 2014-04-09T18:12:52Z 2014-04-09T18:12:52Z YC President Sam Altman interviewed on CNN Money

    "How do we convince that brilliant engineer that has the idea he's really passionate about, that can change the world, to start a startup and not go work as an engineer at a big company?" Altman says.

    Watch the full interview at CNN

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    Garry Tan
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/675300 2014-04-09T18:03:34Z 2014-04-09T18:03:34Z Dropbox (YC W07) releases Dropbox for Business: Remote wipe, account transfer, now coexists with personal

    Via the Dropbox Blog:

    We’re happy to announce that starting today, the all-new Dropbox for Business is available to everyone. We’ve rebuilt the product to give users one Dropbox for personal stuff and another for work stuff. Users can easily access both Dropboxes from any of their devices.

    We did this to give admins more visibility and control over their company’s data. Remote wipe helps protect confidential information, account transfer helps you maintain business continuity, and sharing audit logs let you track how your Dropbox for Business information is being accessed.

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    Garry Tan
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/673337 2014-04-05T16:00:10Z 2014-04-05T16:30:02Z Lumoid (YC S13) Wants To Rent You A Camera Now, And Everything Later

    Aarthi Ramamurthy is standing outside of her building talking to her first paying customer, and she’s about to make a product decision.

    She’s shipped him a camera across country overnight on a rental program, and he’s so in love with it that he wants to buy one from her. He’s wondering if he can apply his rental fee towards the purchase of the camera.

    After quickly running the numbers in her head she replies “Yes!” The customer is happy and she makes Lumoid’s first camera sale.

    Lumoid, a Y Combinator-backed startup, is a service that lets you rent camera equipment of all sorts and, if you like it, you can purchase it. There are some comparisons to be drawn between rental companies, such as lensrentals.com and others, and the “try before you buy” services, such Rocksbox

    But the model doesn’t stop there. 

    Read the full story on TechCrunch
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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/673226 2014-04-05T03:05:04Z 2014-04-06T02:27:48Z Egomotion (YC S11) Raises $750K From Android’s Co-Founder And Others To Make Your Smartphone Smarter

    Greg Kumparak writes:

    Back in November, I wrote about an Android app called Agent. Agent uses your phone’s myriad sensors to make your Android smartphone just a wee bit smarter.

    It’ll detect when you’re driving, and automatically respond to texts to let people know you can’t type right now. During the hours you normally sleep, it’ll auto silence your phone (but still give people a way to ring through in case of an emergency.) When your battery is low, it can flip the switches to turn off things like Bluetooth and auto-sync to eek just a liiiittle more life out of your phone.

    The company behind Agent, Egomotion, recently raised $750k. While it’s not a massive round (Egomotion calls it a “second Seed” rather than a Series A), what I find particularly interesting is who invested.

    The round was lead by Google Ventures, and their investment was driven primarily by Rich Miner, one of Android’s four co-founders. When a guy who helped create the platform you’re trying to improve pushes an investment in your company, you’re probably on to something.

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    Garry Tan
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/669488 2014-03-29T20:42:12Z 2014-04-14T21:26:50Z Meet the People Taking over Hacker News I did several different things while I was working on Hacker News, and these will now be taken over by different people.

    Kevin Hale (HN id kevin) will be in charge of design.  I don't think he plans to change much about the appearance of the site, but users will be happy to hear he has a plan to make it work better on mobile devices.

    Kat Manalac (katm) and Garry Tan (garry) will be the voice of YC on HN.  They'll be the ones who respond to most "Ask YC" posts and individual comments related to YC.

    Nick Sivo (kogir) is going to continue working on the code.  He's been working on HN for a while, and is the reason it's actually faster now than it was a couple years ago, despite increased traffic.

    Finally, I'm delighted to announce that Daniel Gackle (pronounced Gackley), who has already been doing most of the moderation for the last 18 months, is going to join YC full-time to be in charge of the HN community.  Many HN users know Daniel as gruseom, though now he's going to switch to the slightly more legit sounding dang. Daniel is one of most thoughtful (in both senses of the word) people I've ever met. It kills him when people say mean, stupid things in comment threads. Moderating an anonymous forum is hard, and the fact that we get roughly equal grief for HN comments being bad and for being too quick to ban people is a sign he's been doing a good job so far.  He has plans for new tools that may not merely arrest the decay of HN comment threads, but actually improve them.

    I'll still be around as a user, but less frequently than when I felt I had to check the site every hour or so to make sure nothing had broken.

    ]]>
    Paul Graham
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/668131 2014-03-26T23:29:14Z 2014-04-15T00:14:20Z Comprehend (YC W11) founder Rick Morrison on being an enterprise startup in YC

    "When we first founded Comprehend in early 2010, I didn’t consider applying to Y Combinator, even though I was very familiar with YC, Founders at Work, and Paul Graham’s essays. I thought YC only invested in social/local/mobile companies and wouldn’t be interested in, or be helpful to, a startup that sold to life sciences companies, where metrics like ‘viral coefficient’ and ‘daily uniques’ are meaningless and sales cycles can last months.

    However, we ended up applying anyway, at the encouragement of a friend, on the reasoning that we had nothing to lose. In retrospect, this was a great decision because YC has been amazing for learning about startups, fundraising, company building and more. Nowadays, I highly recommend YC to anybody starting a company, including enterprise, even those targeting non-traditional markets. If you’re starting a technology startup, they will be immensely helpful.

    There’s a lot of articles written about tactics for applying to YC, so I won’t address that here. Instead, I wanted to share the areas where YC has been the most helpful to us as an enterprise startup, both during the program and in the 3+ years since they invested."

    Read the full post on Rick Morrison's blog

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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/667875 2014-03-26T16:24:16Z 2014-03-26T16:24:37Z HireArt (YC W12) founder Elli Sharef on not letting fear stop you from applying to YC

    We asked HireArt founder Elli Sharef if she had any advice for YC applicants. 

    Her advice: "If you’re thinking of applying my best advice is: Just do it. You may get in or you may not, but at least you’ll have tried. Being scared of rejection should not dissuade you from applying — if you’re going to be an entrepreneur, you’re going to have to put yourself in many situations in which rejection is a real possibility, so this is a great place to start." 

    Read the full story on the HireArt blog.

    The application deadline for YC S14 is this Friday, March 28. Apply here.


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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/667170 2014-03-24T17:52:25Z 2014-03-24T17:52:26Z Povio (YC W14), The Polite Photo App That Students Love, Joins YC’s Winter Batch

    "It sounds odd to be talking about another photo sharing app, but a young company has – incredibly – come up with an entirely new take on the concept. Povio, a young startup from Slovenia, gained early traction with its clever take on photos and will now join Y Combinator’s winter batch (for which is gets $20k, 3 months’ worth of mentoring and acceleration, in return for 7% equity).

    Povio’s take (available for both iOS and Android) on photo sharing is, bizarrely, unique. We literally haven’t seen anything similar (yet).

    Why? Because all photo sharing apps today are push-based. You see, normally you have to take a picture for your friends to see in order to then elicit a response from them, whether they want it or not. Photo apps today are about a traditional feed model — you post, and it gets pushed out. The problem with that is it does not work terribly well with shy people – and into that category falls millions of teenagers.

    Instead, with Povio, when you’re in the app, you log into your Facebook account and you see a list of your friends who also have Povio. At this point you can “ping” any of them and they’ll get a request from you that lets them easily take a photo and reply back to you."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch
    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/667164 2014-03-24T17:31:08Z 2014-03-24T17:31:09Z Gbatteries (YC W14) Launches BatteryBox, A 50Whr Backup Battery For MacBooks & Other Gadgets

    "Over the years, users of portable consumer electronics have just come to accept that battery life gets worse over time. But it doesn’t have to: Gbatteries, which is in the current batch of Y Combinator companies, has come up with a new technology called BatteryOS that provides better performance without battery-life degradation.

    The first example of this technology is BatteryBox, a rechargeable Lithium-ion battery pack that carries enough power — 50 Whr — to run a MacBook Air for 12 hours, a MacBook Pro for six hours, or to charge eight iPhones."

    See the full story on TechCrunch


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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666959 2014-03-24T01:08:44Z 2014-03-24T01:08:45Z Unbabel (YC W14) Launches A Human-Edited Machine Translation Service To Help Businesses Go Global, Localize Customer Support

    "The sheer number of people not only coming online but shopping, watching, learning and consuming online — from every corner of the globe — is staggering, and every business wants to take advantage. Businesses now know they need to be where their customers are and that they can’t be one-size-fits all if they hope to thrive in today’s global marketplace.

    The problem, of course, is that their new, global customer rarely seems to be speaking the same language. Not surprisingly, translation remains a big, expensive problem for businesses today. Most companies recognize the importance of localizing their websites and content, but few have the time, money or inclination to go one step further and localize that rapidly updating content or section of their site, their FAQs or their customer service interactions.

    For most sites, these last two points, especially, are usually what break the budget — for those lucky (or smart) enough to even have a line of the budget dedicated to translation spend. This is where Unbabel wants to help. The Y Combinator-backed startup is launching today with a new kind of online translation service that aims to make it easy and affordable for a business of any size to translate all of its online content — from marketing collateral and FAQs to customer service emails, both static and dynamic." 

    Read the full story on TechCrunch

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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666872 2014-03-23T18:17:17Z 2014-03-23T18:17:17Z Noora Health’s (W14) Training Program For Patients And Caregivers Improves Recovery And Reduces Readmission Rates

    "If you’ve ever had a major surgery or medical event, you know that the education around recovery leaves much to be desired. When I had a C-section with the birth of my daughter, the hospital gave me a piece of paper that listed some of the medical issues that could take place if my recovery wasn’t going well. But I really had no idea how to handle the recovery–in fact, I made several calls to my physician (and had an untimely ER visit) because of complications.

    Noora Health wants to change this. The nonprofit graduating from Y Combinator is building hospital education platforms for patients and their family members to teach them the skills needed to recover from a major medical event (like a surgery) or manage chronic conditions like diabetes and palliative care. Using an iPad app, Noora Health works with hospitals to offer patients and their families combination of videos, quizzes and interactive content to teach skills to aid in their recovery at home."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch

    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666541 2014-03-21T22:36:33Z 2014-03-21T22:36:33Z Pebble (YC W11) sells 400,000 smart watches in its first year

     Wearable tech start-up Pebble enjoyed a successful first year for its smart watch range, shipping 400,000 since January 2013 and earning an estimated US$60m in revenue. Investors are confident of continued success in 2014, despite increasing competition.

    For CEO Eric Migicovsky, Pebble started out in 2009 as a school project while at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada. The company then joined the Y Combinator programme, one of the world’s top start-up incubators, before it launched a Kickstarter campaign in April 2012.

    The crowdfunding campaign was a runaway success, raising 100 times its original target at US$10.3m. Pebble started shipping to its Kickstarter backers in January 2013, followed by public availability in July. It sold out in five days.

    Some 400,000 smart watches later – according to figures cited in a Fortune Tech interview with Migicovsky – Pebble is now facing stiffer competition in 2014, the year wearable tech is expected to hit the mainstream.

    Read the full article at Silicon Republic

    ]]>
    Garry Tan
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666532 2014-03-21T22:32:34Z 2014-03-21T22:32:34Z Upverter (YC W11) raises $2.3M for cloud-based engineering tool

    Toronto-based startup Upverter, a GitHub-like platform for hardware engineers, or an online design automation platform, has raised $2.3 million from Version One Ventures, Tom McInerney, Autodesk CEO Carl Bass, Amol Sarva (Peek proto-smartphone device), David Lerner and Golden Venture Partners.

    The company will use the money for growth as it pursues the status of a profitable business.

    Originally it was a cloud-based engineering tool for these hardware designers, but the company “evolved considerably”, wrote Techcrunch’s Darryl Etherington, and began earning revenue from from enterprise clients seeking access to its cloud-based tools.

    “Over the summer, we really started to double down on what needed to exist to take the Upverter platform from this hobbyist hacker with open source tool, to this real-deal professional design suite to compete with the big boys, or to become complementary to them,” CEO Zak Homuth told Etherington.

    Read the full article at Betakit

    ]]>
    Garry Tan
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666514 2014-03-21T21:01:04Z 2014-03-21T21:01:04Z StackLead (YC W14) Takes The Hassle Out Of Lead Analysis

    "Imagine you have a huge sign-up list for your yet-to-launch startups or you are a quickly growing company with 50 new sales leads coming in every day. Who are those people signing up for your product? How do you research those leads? In most cases, you have to spend at least a few minutes per sender figuring out who they are and what companies they work for. StackLead, a Y Combinator-backed company that is launching today, wants to take the hassle out of this by automating the customer research process.

    The company was founded by MIT engineers Gordon Wintrob and Ted Tomlinson, who hit upon this idea when they were working on another startup. They found themselves spending a lot of time on researching leads and realized that this was likely a pain point for others, as well." 

    Read the full story on TechCrunch


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    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666142 2014-03-21T16:49:53Z 2014-03-21T16:49:54Z Style Lend (YC W14) Launches Out Of Y Combinator To Be The Airbnb For Women’s Closets

    "Collaborative consumption marketplaces have taken off in recent years to let people share many of the big ticket items in their lives: houses, apartments, cars. A new startup called Style Lend is gunning to be the go-to site for sharing the big ticket items that are sitting in women’s closets.

    Essentially an Airbnb for high-end dresses and accessories, Style Lend is a peer-to-peer marketplace where women can list and rent items for a fraction of their original retail cost. Most women can relate to having at least a couple items in their closets that cost a lot of money, but get very little wear: That one special occasion dress, or designer handbag. These kinds of items stick around because they aren’t quite candidates for consignment. She loves them and wants to keep them, but the truth is that they stay in the closet 95% of the time."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch
    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666082 2014-03-20T20:52:55Z 2014-03-20T20:52:55Z One Degree (YC W14) Is A “Yelp For Social Services” That Helps Low-Income Families

    "When Rey Faustino migrated from the Philippines to Southern California as an eight-year-old, he saw his family hustle to make ends meets in their new homeland. “I grew up in a working-class family and I watched my family struggle for resources,” he said. “I wanted to make sure that other kids and families didn’t have to go through the same ordeal.”

    So while completing a graduate degree at Harvard in public policy, he put together a business plan for One Degree, a new non-profit that helps people find social services like affordable housing and job training. As a child, Faustino remembers that individual social workers had all of this information in their heads about the best programs to route families and low-income workers to.

    But there wasn’t a scalable, single destination where anybody could go to find whatever they needed, whether it was low-cost medical care or free after-school programs. He and Eric Lukoff created One Degree, a highly-curated search engine for social services. The site gives personalized recommendations and steps for people to take." 

    Read the full story on TechCrunch

    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666075 2014-03-20T20:43:30Z 2014-03-20T20:43:30Z Where’s The Party? Shoobs (YC W14) Wants To Be Ticketmaster For Local Nightlife Events

    "Shoobs means party. It’s also a U.K. startup aiming to become Ticketmaster for local nightlife events. Wondering which hot DJs are coming to your corner of town soon? Shoobs wants to be the place you go to figure out where to direct your next set of dancefloor moves — and book tickets for the party.

    But that’s only the half of this startup business. For nightlife events’ organisers, Shoobs provides a self-service platform to promote upcoming events, sell tickets and connect with clubgoers.

    It’s aiming to replace old school promotional tactics of flyers pressed into the sweaty palms of dancers filing out of the club after a six-hour toe-shaking session. And paper tickets that have to be tracked down by ringing a promoter’s mobile number and meeting them on a street corner. Old school is the word."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch


    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666072 2014-03-20T20:31:30Z 2014-03-20T20:31:30Z Camperoo (YC W14) Helps Parents Find And Book Summer Camps & Other Activities For Kids

    "Parents looking to plan their children’s extracurricular activities, find summer camps or day programs are these days faced with a fairly time-consuming task, and one which involves more than a bit of internet research, and even phoning around town. That’s because there’s no centralized resource for discovery these sorts of programs. A startup called Camperoo wants to change that by aggregating things like summer camps, karate camps, science and technology camps, cooking classes and more, all under one roof.

    The company was launched last spring by Emmie Chang, who, though not a parent herself, had first-hand experience in the space, having previously started and run a technology camp for kids. (That program continues today, though Chang stepped down from her day-to-day involvement there several years ago.)"

    Read the full story on TechCrunch

    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/666039 2014-03-20T19:20:25Z 2014-03-20T19:20:25Z Beacon (YC W14) Featured in the NYTimes: A Website Asks Readers to Finance Independent Journalists
    "With news publications increasingly charging for their once-free websites and apps, they face a critical question: Will readers pay for digital content? Now, one Internet start-up has put a twist on that question: Will readers pay for a journalist?

    The start-up, called Beacon, kicked off a campaign on Wednesday to support Shane Bauer, a hiker and journalist who was imprisoned in Iran for 26 months. If all goes as planned, readers will fund Mr. Bauer’s entire $75,000 salary for a year to report on the American prison system." 

    Read the full story on NYTimes.com

    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/665772 2014-03-20T18:10:22Z 2014-03-20T18:10:22Z CodeCombat (YC W14) Wants You To Learn To Code By Playing Games

    "So you’ve decided you want to learn to code, but don’t know where to start. There are dozens of services out there that can help you find your way, but a new YC-backed company wants to teach you how to code through gamification.

    The web-based game teaches rudimentary JavaScript fundamentals, including everything you’d learn in an introductory computer science course, by forcing you to code your way through the game. In order to get from one level to the next, you must understand the lesson being taught and prove it through writing your own code." 

    Read the full story on TechCrunch]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/665460 2014-03-19T16:30:08Z 2014-03-19T16:30:08Z Two New YC Partners: Justin Kan and Aaron Harris I'm delighted to announce that Justin Kan and Aaron Harris are joining Y Combinator as Partners.

    Justin was in the very first YC batch with me in the summer of 2005, and has been a part-time partner since 2011. Justin founded Kiko, Justin.tv/Twitch.tv, Socialcam, and Exec. He took the "do what it takes" directive of startups unusually far with Justin.tv, when he wore a webcam on his head and broadcast his entire life for 8 months, 24 hours a day.

    For some time now, Justin has been who we send startups to with questions about growth and marketing. But he knows a ton about nearly every part of startups.

    Aaron was in the YC Winter 2011 batch doing Tutorspree, which moved back to New York after their batch. He’s actually been a partner since October 2013—sometimes it takes us a while to get around to announcing things.

    Aaron will also advise startups on all topics, but he’s especially good with anything related to finance.

    We're all very happy to have both of them on the team.

    ]]>
    Sam Altman
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/665449 2014-03-19T15:44:25Z 2014-03-19T15:44:25Z Threadable’s (YC W14) Mailing List For Teams Makes Your Inbox Less Noisy

    "One of the problems with mailing lists today, especially when used for work-related purposes or organizing large groups around some sort of project, is that they can quickly become overwhelming. Annoyed, many users then create a filter to archive the mailing list so it stays out of their inbox. Y Combinator-backed Threadable, a newly launched mailing list management solution, wants to offer a better way.

    It aims to improve group communication within teams by making emails more actionable. That is, emails sent with Threadable let users quickly mute message threads, turn threads into tasks and claim them, mark tasks as done, and more."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch

    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/665192 2014-03-18T20:02:21Z 2014-03-18T20:02:21Z Boostable (YC W14) Offers A New Way For Online Sellers To Advertise

    "Boostable, which is part of the current class of startups at incubator Y Combinator, says it’s giving the individual sellers on online marketplaces a smarter way to promote themselves.

    If someone’s trying to promote (say) their products on Etsy, or their events on Eventbrite, or their housing on Airbnb, they can already buy ads for themselves. However, co-founder and CEO Selcuk Atli said that many of those sellers “don’t have the time or the expertise” to actually do so. Or if they do, it’s hard to tell whether their ads are actually paying off — sure, they may (or may not) see an uptick in sales and traffic, but they won’t know how much of it was actually driven by a given ad or campaign.

    Boostable, on the other hand, has integrated with various marketplaces to offer these sellers “a massively simple solution,” Atli said. Using the URL of their store, sellers are supposed to be able to sign up and create an ad within minutes. The ads will actually be branded as an ad for the broader marketplace, but they’ll be paid for by the individual seller and point to that seller’s web page."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch
    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/665175 2014-03-18T19:31:50Z 2014-03-18T19:31:51Z Healthy Food Delivery Startup Zesty (YC W14) Goes Corporate With The Launch Of A Catering Service

    "If you work at a startup or tech company, one of the perks you’ve probably gotten used to is a free lunch. Those meals have become ubiquitous through a number of tech companies in San Francisco, but too often, there aren’t a lot of healthy options provided. Healthy food delivery startup Zesty wants to change that, with the launch of an office catering program.

    Zesty launched an app late last year that provides its customers with healthy food options from nearby restaurants. With a combination of technology and data, as well as the help of an on-staff nutritionist, it was able to create a curated menu of dishes from dozens of restaurants around San Francisco."

    Read the full story on TechCrunch
    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/665157 2014-03-18T18:54:44Z 2014-03-18T18:54:44Z MadeSolid (YC W14) Is Creating Next-Gen 3D Printing Materials

    It seems like we can’t go a week these days without hearing about some new startup making a new 3D printer that wants to be better and cheaper than everything else. I’m not complaining, of course — competition is good for everyone. But it’s a tough space if you’re looking to stand out.

    MadeSolid, a YC-backed company out of Emeryville, CA, is going after the 3D printing market from the other end: they want to fix the materials we 3D print with.

    Read the full story on TechCrunch
    ]]>
    Y Combinator
    tag:blog.ycombinator.com,2013:Post/664830 2014-03-18T01:07:52Z 2014-03-18T01:07:52Z Divorce service Wevorce (YC W13) adds video calls to its lineup of mediation tools

    "Over the past few months, Wevorce has been quietly testing and tweaking a new service for couples who are seeking an all-online divorce process. The new feature is videoconferencing, and it might be a much better way to handle online divorces with sticking points such as custody and financial settlements.

    Many sites offer online-only divorces, but these work best for uncontested divorces with little or no common property. These services are designed to help parents avoid heated battles over kids and money. For these big, sensitive topics, a few online forms just don’t cut it."

    Read the full story on VentureBeat
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