Automatic (YC S11) connects to your car's data port, lets you see everything about your car and driving patterns

People spend a ton of money on their cars every year, from car payments to insurance to gas to maintenance. But for such expensive assets, most people normally don’t know a whole lot about what’s happening under the hood, or how they can drive or maintain their cars better over time. The folks at Automatic want to change all that, with a smart combination of hardware and mobile apps to keep people better informed of how their cars are doing.

Automatic has two main components to it: There’s a small hardware dongle that connects to a car’s onboard computer, which provides data about the state of the car and trips it makes, as well as a mobile app that collects and analyzes all that data. Together, they can provide a whole lot more insight into users’ vehicles than they have currently.

The Automatic Link, which connects to a car’s diagnostics port, is a $70 piece of hardware with built-in Bluetooth connectivity for transferring data from your car’s computer to your mobile phone. The app then looks at the data to act as a “smart driving assistant.” Based on what it knows about each trip, it can provide users with tips to help get better fuel efficiency, drive more safely, and extend the life of their cars.

Read the full article on Techcrunch

Pre-order your Automatic at automatic.com

Clerky (YC S11) launches the fastest, easiest way to incorporate a startup

When we cover a startup’s launch, we often focus on the market opportunity, funding and investors and how the company’s product is solving a particular problem. We rarely mention the initial set of challenges every entrepreneur must face when they actually turn an idea into a startup — incorporation, stock issuance documents and more. Most of the time, startups have to incur legal costs to do this. However, Clerky, a Y Combinator-backed startup launching today, is hoping to offer entrepreneurs a quality, cost-effective, automated way to handle incorporation documents and more.

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Here’s how it works. Founders enter email address and other info such as company name, board of directors and more into Clerky. Clerky then emails all the founders and involved parties, and in a few clicks everyone can digitally sign and date everything. Clerky handles all paperwork with the Secretary of State of Delaware. The whole process happens online and entrepreneurs turn their startups into a legal, valid Delaware C Corp.

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Y Combinator has been using Clerky in stealth for three full batches with over 100 startups incorporated using the service. The forms used were developed in cooperation with YC, Orrick, Imagine K12 and an incubator named Boost.

Kirsty Nathoo, Y Combinator’s CFO (read our profile of her here) says of Clerky, “I spend lots of time working with companies to fix problems with their formation, like incomplete documentation, non-standard terms, inconsistency, etc., which usually occur when founders try to handle it themselves. When Y Combinator funds an unincorporated startup, I send the founders to Clerky and know everything will be done correctly.”

Read the full article on Techcrunch

Incorporate your startup at Clerky

Matterport (YC W12) launches a 3D interactive scanner for real world environments, announces $5.6M funding round

Matterport, a company set to soon launch a 3D camera and interactive viewing platform that will allow users to create digital ‘scans’ of real-world environments and share them online, has announced a $5.6m funding round.

Matterport’s camera will allow you to scan whole rooms and let others explore them via a Web browser or iPad. Some of the uses for this could be to explore a home you’re looking to buy or rent for a vacation, or to check out a restaurant you’re thinking of visiting. That said, such photo-realistic scans could have all sorts of other uses – game development being an obvious possibility.

You can try out the quality of the scans created here

Read the full article on The Next Web

Pathjoy (YC S10) raises $1.7M from Andreessen Horowitz, First Round Capital, Resolute.VC, Max Levchin, PB, others

Pathjoy, a Y Combinator-incubated startup that makes it easy and affordable to have your home cleaned, is announcing that it has raised $1.7 million in seed funding. It’s taking on a new name that sounds like a better fit for its mission — goodbye Pathjoy, hello Homejoy.

The funding came from Andreessen HorowitzFirst Round Capital, Mike Hirshland/Resolute.VC, Max Levchin, Paul Buchheit, Saba Software CEO Bobby Yazdani, and Pejman Nozad. CEO and co-founder Adora Cheung told me that the investors seemed to be particularly excited about connecting unemployed and underemployed people with work, and about a service that’s spreading thanks to word of mouth.

Read the full article on Techcrunch

ScreenHero (YC W13) launches Windows version of collaborative screen sharing app

Erin Bury at Betakit writes:

When it comes to enterprise collaboration tools, products like Dropbox, Basecamp, and Google Apps have changed the way companies work together online. Startup Screenhero is looking to change just one aspect of the enterprise collaboration space with its product: screensharing. The Mountain View, CA-based company, which is currently participating in startup accelerator Y Combinator’s latest class, launched a beta version of its Mac app in December 2012, and today is releasing its Windows version in public beta.

Since its public beta launch on February 11th, the company has seen over 5,000 registered users sign up, who shared 26,000 minutes of screen time last week alone.

Read the full article at Betakit

SimplyInsured (YC W13) launches to take the pain out of health insurance quotes and enrollment

For small businesses, buying and managing health insurance is a “pain in the buns,” to quote my new favorite ad. Not only are its complicated terms, lack of transparency, slow quoting and on-boarding process and paper trail a pain in your buns, but health insurance can be a massive pain in your wallet, to boot. Hidden costs are everywhere.

Y Combinator-backed SimplyInsured is launching today with a solution. Founders Vivek Shah and George Huo, who were also both early employees at YC startup Cardpool (which sold to Blackhawk Network in late 2011), have built a simple, online health insurance manager and quote engine for small businesses, which aims to explain in plain English what is or isn’t working about your current plan and help you identify hidden costs and cost-savings.

Read the full article on Techcrunch

Get instant quotes for health insurance for yourself and your small business at SimplyInsured

Save your business from password hell: Meldium (YC W13) launches secure cloud password service for all your SaaS apps

If you’ve been part of a small- or medium-sized business or organization recently, you’ve dealt with “the spreadsheet.” It’s that document that’s tacked up on the wall (or shared via email) where all the group’s important login names and passwords are kept — the team's Twitter DropBox LexisNexis subscription, et cetera.

It’s a mess to maintain in itself, of course, but the real problems come when people leave the team. Right away, an admin must go one by one through shared apps such as Yammer and WordPress and disable access to the group version. As for the spreadsheet? Well, here’s hoping nobody copied the information to take with them (and take the official Twitter account for one last joyride.)

It’s awful, but it’s the status quo. The good news is that a brand new company has created something much, much better.

Meldium, a company that’s set to graduate next month from Silicon Valley startup incubator Y Combinator, has created a way for small- to medium-sized businesses and teams to securely share access to all the apps they use.

Read the full article on Techcrunch

Semantics3 (YC W13) launches the one Consumer Products API to rule them all: Over 20M products with clean metadata

As more merchants flock to the web to sell their products, there has been a deluge of data to be indexed by retailers who are looking to see where certain products are being sold and for how much. Parsing and extracting the value from all of this data is a huge challenge. YC-backed Semantics3 has created a database that aims to track every product sold online, and every price it has ever been sold at, providing retailers with an API to this database.

The company, which was founded by classmates at a computer engineering college program in Singapore, indexes several dozen of the top e-commerce sites online and provides a self-serve API so developers can tap into its constantly updated database of consumer products. Why would developers want to index this data? Retailers need to do UPC lookups, get detailed data for products (i.e. consumer electronics or clothing) sold on the web, price histories and more.

Read the full article on Techcrunch

From Triceratops excavation to Anthrax therapeutics: Microryza (YC W13) launches a Kickstarter for scientific research

Do you want to know whether cannibalism existed amongst Tyrannosaurus Rexes or whether specific viruses contribute to lung cancer risk? Better yet, do you want to be part of making this research happen faster?

A Y Combinator-backed startup called Microryza is positioning itself as a “Kickstarter” for science research. The idea for Microryza sprouted when Cindy Wu, then an undergraduate at University of Washington, found that she had little hope of getting funding for studying a potential anthrax therapeutic.

She had discovered it after helping to create a video game that let regular people fold and create virtual enzymes. They came up with 87 different mutants that summer through the video game, and found that one could potentially treat anthrax infections after winning an MIT-based synthetic biology competition.

Read the full article at Techcrunch

Visit microryza.com and fund original scientific research

Thalmic (YC W13) launches the Myo armband for gesture control

As stuff like Google Glass becomes mainstream, we’re going to see a lot more wearable computing devices around. But one thing that isn’t clear is how we’ll control them. One idea is to use gesture control, which would enable users to communicate with wearable computers without having to use a whole separate smartphone or other device to do so.

But so far, gesture control for most devices — like the Xbox Kinect, for instance — has depended upon cameras watching user movement. That means remaining in a fixed space and using pre-programmed gestures that are not exactly natural, but can be picked up by cameras. As a result, today’s gesture control technologies are far from perfect. In fact, most to date are just downright bad.

Y Combinator-backed startup Thalmic Labs believes it has a better way of determining user intent when using gesture control. To do so, it’s developed a new device, called MYO, which is an armband worn around the forearm. Using Bluetooth, the armband can wirelessly connect to other devices, such as PCs and mobile phones, to enable user control based on their movements without directly touching the electronics.

See it in action here:

Read the full article on Techcrunch

Preorder at getmyo.com