Think Gaming (YC S14) Demystifies Paid App Installs With A Mobile Gaming Co-Op

When we last checked in with New York-based Think Gaming, the company was hoping to create a sort of AngelList for mobile games in an effort to connect developers with strategic partners and investors. The company has refocused its business a bit since then, and is now seeking to help mobile game developers to get wider distribution by helping them to maximize their reach through install ads.

The company, which is part of the current Y Combinator class, has created what it’s calling a mobile advertising co-op. Through that co-op, gaming companies share data about the cost of the ads they’re purchasing across multiple networks, and the effectiveness of those ad networks.

App installs are a $10 billion global market, but until now most developers were in the dark about which networks perform best for their games, and the only way to find out was through trial and error. That gave major game developers like King and Supercell an advantage over indie gamers, simply because they already have the size, distribution, and marketing budgets to optimize their ad spend.

Demo Day Online

Our summer batch is big this year – approximately 85 startups will be presenting their products and services at our Demo Day next month.  We know that not everyone we’ve invited to Demo Day will be able to attend for the entire day (or at all), so we plan to put videos of the presentations online shortly after Demo Day so that invitees can watch any presentations they miss.  The videos will only be available to Demo Day invitees and password-protected, but ideally someday we can make Demo Day presentations available to a wider audience.

Tiempo (YC S14) Wants To Simplify Time Tracking So You Can Focus On Work

Y Combinator-backed Tiempo is a free time-tracking app for iOSAndroid and the web that can be used by individuals or companies to track employee hours to pay them faster.

Employees can log in hours and send it to their manager for approval. An approved invoice can be paid in moments, and the payment arrives in the employee’s bank account in less than 3 days.

Tad Milbourn, CEO and co-founder of Tiempo, said he, Peter Terrill and Kyle Kilat, who all met at Intuit, wanted to help people focus on work, rather than worrying about getting paid.

Diversity and Startups

Sexism in tech is real.  One of the most insidious things happening in the debate is people claiming versions of “other industries may have problems with sexism, but our industry doesn’t.”  Both men and women claim this, even though it keeps getting harder to do in the face of shocks like the Tinder texts.  We know there is a problem, especially when it comes to starting companies, and we think YC can do something about it.

I’m willing to believe it’s worse in other industries [1], but it’s still very bad in our own industry.  Debating how to fix it is important, but debating whether or not sexism actually exists trivializes the problem in a toxic way.  A lot of women may not experience sexism, a lot of women may experience it but not talk about it, and a lot of men aren’t sexist.  Saying “There isn’t any sexism in tech” in the face of a mountain of data hurts things in subtle and not-so-subtle ways.

Although the current debate is mostly focused on gender, and I think women face some of the worst discrimination in tech, they are certainly not the only group that faces discrimination.

We—the tech industry as a whole—need to fix this.  Most importantly, it’s an ethical issue.  And speaking for YC, it’s also in our best interest.  People who are not white males will start many of the best companies of the future, and we’d like to fund them.  (White men will start many of the best companies, and we’d like to fund those too.) 

We have continued to listen to the community and are trying to understand what we can do to help.  Realizing that it’s hard to speak with much authority here as a white guy, I’d still like to share some current data about YC and also talk about what we’ve been doing and will do to improve the situation.

We think YC can help drive real change, and we hope lots of other organizations will join.

Some YC diversity data

It’s hard to put exact numbers on this because we don’t have a precise definition for “technical” and we don’t ask for gender on the application form, but it appears we fund technical women that apply to YC at a slightly higher rate than technical men that apply to YC for at least the last few years. [2] However, a lower percentage of women than men that apply are technical.

We can get more precise number when we disregard background and just look at the gender of applicants (based on looking at the application videos)—19.5% of the startups we have funded this year have women on the founding team compared to approximately 24.3% of startups that applied, based on a random sample of a few hundred applications.

As a side note, even though it will break backwards compatibility, we are considering changing how we look at this to the percentage of all founders that are women instead of the percentage of companies with a female founder.  Encouragingly, the percentage of women applying continues to trend up year after year.

10% of our companies currently worth more than $100 million are now run by women.  These women aren’t just on the founding team—they’re the CEOs.  While this number is still much smaller than we’d like, and I believe we can do more to make it higher, it’s a big improvement from 0% a few years ago and well above the industry average.

39.6% of the founders in our current batch were not born in the US, representing  27 different countries.

We have four female full-time partners (and in addition to advising startups, to a large extent they run YC).

What we’re doing 

One of the most-repeated things we’ve heard from our founders and others is that in addition to holding focused events like the Female Founders Conference, it’s important to make sure we have women speaking at all of our conferences and during our batches, which we’ve been doing.  We’re also showcasing more women and people of different ages and races on our website.  Positive role models are wonderfully effective, and we have more and more successful women who can inspire the next generation of founders

We will continue to ask our successful female founders to spend some of their time telling their story and being role models.  They, and others, can also talk about the challenges women face running startups far more authoritatively than I ever can. 

One thing I’ve heard again and again is that the hardest challenges are not the obvious ones.  Yes, it’s awful to hear the horror stories of wildly inappropriate behavior from investors to the entrepreneurs pitching them. (Unfortunately, stories like these are not super rare, but because there’s a big cost to going public with them, most never get told.  My hope is that YC has enough leverage at this point to make it clear that this is unacceptable and we will not continue to work with investors who do it.)  The thing I didn’t appreciate until I spent a lot of time talking to female founders is that unlike the occasional terrible incidents, there are frequent minor incidents—to stick with the fundraising example, many women told stories of investors only talking to their male founders in the room.  And more generally, many just don’t feel like they belong in the startup culture.

We won’t be able to stop all bad behavior, of course, but I do think we’ll be able to help reduce it.

Nearly all of the women I’ve spoken to feel that Hacker News has improved a great deal—and even when jerks write nasty comments, they usually get a lot of responses of the type we like to see.  But there is still more we can do, even though we’ll probably never be able to rid ourselves of Internet trolls completely.  Specifically, we’d like the community to help by downvoting comments that make HN an unwelcoming place to anyone.  We made a significant change to the downvoting algorithm a few months ago.  When we see comments that are threatening or worse, we ban the accounts and say on the thread that we don’t tolerate the behavior.  We are also working on new guidelines for HN comments.

We’re encouraging our startups to get HR infrastructure in place earlier.  Many startups wait until they have 50 or so employees before thinking about this; our sense is that many will benefit by doing it earlier.  Traditionally, startups have thought of HR as a drag on moving fast and openness, but a well-running team is one of the best assets a company can ever have.  We’re working on some projects here but aren’t ready to share details yet.

Another thing that we’ve heard is a belief that YC prefers companies with technical talent on the founding team.  This is true.  Based on all the data we’ve seen, it seems like a smart thing to prefer.  We’ll make exceptions—not every company needs complex technology to win, and not all leaders have to be expert coders.  But this is part of our DNA, and what makes us work—it’s a challenge to have a software company without at least one cofounder who can write software and evaluate and attract other coders.  This isn’t unique to tech; movie people should probably run movie companies.

Even if founders don’t code day-to-day—I didn’t after the first couple of years of my startup—a deep understanding of technology is still very valuable for leaders of technology companies.

So we’re especially excited by efforts to make learning to code more accessible.  Teaching people to code is not the only thing we need to do.  In addition to taking a long time to effect change, there are other problems in the industry like the attrition rate of women and minorities in tech that we need to fix.  But anyone who wants to learn to code should be able, with lots of encouragement along the way (this goes for any sort of engineering, of course.)  It’s an important long-term step to take.

Not everyone wants to learn to code—there are plenty of other interesting things to learn, and plenty of other ways to contribute value to a startup—but our sense is that a lot more people would be interested in it if they thought software development was a viable career path.

Google’s recent work here is great, as is the work of YC companies like Hacker School, Codecademy and MakeGamesWithUs.  YC also funds companies that help people learn to code, and we are especially interested in funding non-profits trying to help make STEM education more available and the tech world more inclusive.  We also try to host, judge, and help fundraise for hackathons and other tech events designed to broaden the community.

Teaching people who want to learn to code how to do so, ideally at a young age, is one of the most important things the world can do to increase the pool of potential startup founders, even though this will take a very long time to produce change.  Teaching people about startups is probably less important than teaching people how to code, but still a valuable thing to do.  We’re planning to put more resources online to help people learn how to start startups.  More good startups will be good for everyone. 

We—the industry as a whole—still have a huge amount of work to do, and we need a lot of organizations to be involved.  We hope what we’re doing will help.  This will be an ongoing process for YC, and as always please keep sharing your feedback.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

 


[1] My mom is a doctor.  When I was maybe 12 years old, I went with her on a Saturday to the hospital and we went into the doctor’s lounge.  My mom pointed out to me there was a men’s bathroom but no women’s bathroom.  I thought (and still think) my mom was the best doctor ever.  I remember being incensed by this in the weeks after and the image is still very clear in my mind.

This was the late 1990s in Missouri, which is certainly different than the 2010s in California but not wildly so.    

[2] My guess for the explanation here is that it’s easier to start a startup as a man than a woman, and so the talent pool is more concentrated on the side of women who start startups.

How 7 Cups of Tea (YC S13) Accidentally Grew a Community of 17,000 Listeners

Most people would much rather donate money to help others than they would donate their time and energy. Getting people to volunteer can be one of the most difficult challenges a community builder can face. How about getting 17,000 people to volunteer? Think you can take that on?

That’s exactly what 7 Cups of Tea did. And as a community of “active listeners,” they did much more than get people to volunteer. Every volunteer listener completes a training program and then actually chat with and listen to other members of the community. And they did it all in one year.

“We call it the emotional support system for the Internet” explains CEO and clinical psychologist Glen Moriarty. “We just celebrated our one-year anniversary and are thrilled with the way the community is growing.The community gave back to 7 Cups of Tea on their birthday by making a thank you video to the entire team and joining them in an all-day chat party.

Read the full story on cmxhub.com

Lawn Love (YC S14) Wants To Bring The Whole “Software Eating The World” Thing To Your Own Backyard

Lawncare and landscaping are areas that have remained largely un-”disrupted” in the whole software eating the world trend that’s been going on in recent years. If you’re in one of the 80 percent of American households that have a lawn, chances are that you either take care of mowing and upkeep yourself, or you have hired a local lawncare provider you’ve found the old fashioned way, through a recommendation of someone you know — research shows that fully 98 percent of the $74 billion landscape industry business marketing is done through customer referrals. Getting a quote on lawncare is usually an in-person affair, and booking and payments are not often conducted through the web or a mobile phone.

Lawn Love is a new startup launching out of the Summer 2014 batch of Y Combinator that aims to add a layer of tech-enabled ease to the process of finding, booking, and paying a landscaping or lawncare provider. Essentially positioned as a Homejoy for lawncare, Lawn Love has built a web platform that works as a two-way marketplace with the aim of bringing more efficiency and protection to both sides of the business transaction.

Checkr (YC S14) Automates Background Checks For The New, On-Demand Economy

The nature of employment is changing. Thanks to a growing number of platforms offering on-demand services in more places around the world, there’s now massive demand for workers to perform services and deliver goods to users. As those businesses have scaled up, that’s created a need for better processes around vetting and bringing on new workers quickly.

The best example of this is probably Uber, which reported recently that it will complete 2 million background checks in 2014. But the process of getting background checks completed hasn’t changed much, even if companies are requesting a whole lot more of them.

Y Combinator-backed Checkr wants to change that.

Checkr was founded by Daniel Yanisse and Jonathan Perichon, who are two software engineers that used to work for an on-demand delivery startup that ran into the problem of running background checks for drivers it wanted to recruit. They decided that if they added a little bit of technology, they would be able to automate the process and enable companies to fit into their existing workflows.

Fixed (YC S14) Raises $1.2 Million For A Mobile App That Fights Your Parking Tickets For You

Fixed, the clever mobile application that helps you fight your parking tickets just by snapping a photo of the ticket with your mobile phone, has now closed on $1.2 million in seed funding. Investors in the round include Y CombinatorMerus CapitalScott Banister, John Cobbs, Mark Randolph, Matt Humphries, Eric Wu and David King.

Headquartered in San Francisco, which also serves as its debut market, Fixed first launched this January, allowing residents to snap photos of their tickets using an iOS device. Afterwards, Fixed checks for common errors before proceeding to write a customized contest letter on your behalf, which is sent to the city.

The company recently opened up its waitlist to the entire San Francisco metro area and has since seen 35,000 users sign up for its service.

OpenCurriculum (YC W14) Looks To Foster Open-Source Education By Releasing Free Online Library

YC W14 non-profit OpenCurriculum announced the launch of a free, online library of educational materials for math teachers:

Aimed at providing teachers with educational materials by making them open and competitive, OpenCurriculum, which launched in Pittsburgh, curates and organizes material from sites such as teacher blogs and lesson material publishers. Teachers can create lesson plans and more through OpenCurriculum.org.

In its effort to provide high-quality learning and an openness in K-12 education, OpenCurriculum released a 5,000-document library on its website for math teachers to use as lesson materials. Anyone can use the material on the website without logging in, but to get access to tools such as the lesson plan builder, you need to create an account. The tools aren’t tailored for a particular subject matter.

OpenCurriculum’s tools are used by about 6,000 teachers and users every month. With the tools from the new library, about 20 teachers who were in beta with the library found that teachers are saving 50 percent of the first-time lesson planning and 20 percent of lesson plan revision time.

Unbabel (YC W14) Raises $1.5M To Expand Translation Service, Grow Customer Base

Congrats, Unbabel team! 

In the interconnected world, machines are too rigid in understanding the nuances in translating languages and humans are too slow for on-the-fly translation. That’s why Unbabel brings robots and humans together to deliver a faster and affordable translation service.

Launched in March and backed by Y Combinator, CEO and co-founder Vasco Pedro says four months later, Unbabel is growing about 15 percent a week in sales and 12 percent a week on the number of editors working on the platform. The company has about 160 paying customers.