Popset (YC W12) Makes Group Photo-Sharing Easy, Export To Facebook Even Easier

Popset, a new mobile app from the current Winter 2012 batch of Y Combinator startups, is a way for groups of friends to privately share photos. Oh what, you’ve heard that one before? Yes, it’s true – mobile photo-sharing is a crowded space. However, there hasn’t been a de facto leader established in the particular category Popset is after: sharing photos in private groups, easy photo album creation, and support for exporting entire albums to Facebook.

Each of Popset’s features may remind you somewhat of other apps, including group texting apps like Beluga and GroupMe, the earlier incarnation of Path, Batch, LiveShare, and others, but none of Popset’s competitors share the exact same feature set implemented in the exact same way.

Get the app now on iOS

Quartzy (YC S11) Scores $1.2M To Help Life Scientists Stay Organized

Keeping a constant supply of clean socks in the drawer can prove a challenge for most of us. Imagine the lengths scientists must go to keep the thousands of tools of their trade–especially chemicals–in stock at their labs.

Quartzy believes it can help. The company, which told VentureWire it closed a $1.2 million seed round led by the New York-based Life Sciences Angel Network in December, has developed a free web app to help life scientists manage their labs, inventories and orders.

ScreenLeap (YC W12) launches today: Because Screen-Sharing Doesn’t Need To Make You Crazy

ScreenLeap, a new startup out of the latest Y Combinator batch, wants to make this process a lot less painful, so that next time you’re confronted with an issue that could be better dealt with via screen-share, you actually take advantage of it. And to do that, they’re offering a product that’s about straightforward as it gets: click a link, and you’re looking at your friend’s screen.

Of course, ScreenLeap is far from the first company that’s looking to take on WebEx and the other well-established screen-sharing platforms — competitors include GoInstant, which debuted at TC Disrupt SF back in September, JoinMe, and even Google+, which offers screensharing as part of its Hangouts feature. So what sets ScreenLeap apart? Cofounder Tuyen Truong says that it’s the only service that uses JavaScript and HTML in its viewer, which means that just about any browser — including those on smartphones — can view a broadcast without having to install any additional software.

Glassmap (YC S11) launches a simpler Find My Friends that works great with Facebook

YC-backed Glassmap is a new mobile application publicly launching today that presents a viable challenge to realtime, location-sharing apps like Apple’s Find My Friends or Google Latitude. Where those two competitors focus on enabling social experiences on top of their own platforms or ecosystems, Glassmap is enabling a third alternative: realtime location tracking built on top of Facebook’s social graph. Yes, it’s like a “Find My Facebook Friends.”

However, this app isn’t using Facebook check-ins to track your friends – it’s actually tracking them in real time, by running the app passively in the background. And that’s where Glassmap’s killer feature comes in: the startup is using “relay” technology to minimize the typical battery drains associated with realtime location-sharing apps today.

Glassmap is available now for download on iOS and on Android

Start-up Q&A: How GoCardless (YC S11) are giving the credit card companies a run for their money

Getting paid can be a nightmare. Whether you’re collecting small sums from your Fantasy Football League or you’re a crafty sort selling mittens online, accepting payments is expensive and time-consuming. Only big companies like British Gas have the luxury of accepting Direct Debits and the alternatives all carry a punitive charge. Until now.

Tom Blomfield, Matt Robinson and Hiroki Takeuchi are three Oxford graduates who defied the odds to get into the Direct Debit niche, jumping regulatory hoops and smashing development challenges to launch a brand new kind of payments business. GoCardless lets any business or individual accept Direct Debits for a 1% transaction fee (to a maximum total – that’s right, maximum – of £2). It’s one of those businesses that are so simple you don’t know how it hasn’t been done before.

MT caught up with Robinson and Blomfield on the day of their public launch to find out how they did it.

Great Q&A about how GoCardless got started disrupting payments with Direct Debits.

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